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The annual BANTRAK Festival of Trains show at the B&O museum is coming up, which means I’m going to have an opportunity to show off a bunch of my rolling stock. However, I realized my stockpile of cars needing weathering has grown significantly, so it was time to do something about that.

My general freight car weathering approach isn’t to make each car a masterpiece, but to try and get all cars up to a general sense of acceptability and realism. To that end, I’ve developed a process where I an rapidly move through cars, and do them in batches.

I use a wash technique, with either model or craft paints thinned with 70% rubbing alcohol.

Here are the cars I did using this technique in the last “binge weathering session”.

Some cars turned out better than others. I may come back to the ones I’m not thrilled with and try cleaning them up. That’s one of the great advantages of this weathering approach.

 

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One of my favorite cars from this weathering binge: a Eastern Seaboard Models X58.
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At Atlas 60′ auto parts car. Not one of the better weathering jobs, but it has its charm.

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A Micro-Trains 60′ excess height car.
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My newest addition to my freight car fleet, a Wheels of Time PC&F car.
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I’m pretty satisfied with how this WoT PC&F came out too.
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And my oldest WoT car, I’m also happy with the subtlety of this car’s weathering as well.
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A pair of Atlas Trainman 50′ CN boxcars.
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I believe this is an Intermountain car.
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One of two ExactRail Southern “Waffle Side” cars.
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This ER Waffle Side features a door assist mechanism.

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